Wednesday, 2 October 2013

Health; Asthma Awareness

Over the last few days I have been doing some reading and research on Asthma. Being a bit of health geek I thought I would share some facts and information about the condition, as I was quite shocked about some of the figures that I have come across.



Through out the United Kingdom, there are many people that suffer with chronic respiratory diseases, one of the most common being Asthma.

Definition: 


A respiratory condition marked by spasms in the bronchi of the lungs, causing difficulty in breathing. It usually results from an allergic reaction or other forms of hypersensitivity


Facts;

  • 5.4 million people in the United Kingdom are currently receiving treatment for asthma - 1.1 million of these being children.

  • Which means across the country one in five house holds are are affected
  • At least three people die every single day because of asthma most of these deaths are avoidable
  • Cost; The NHS spends approximately one billion per year, treating and caring for people with Asthma.


No-one knows what causes asthma (although genetics and environmental factors have been thought to play a part). It is characterised by inflammation and swelling of the lining of the airways leading to acute episodes known as ‘attacks’. - See more at: http://www.improvement.nhs.uk/lung/NationalImprovementProjects/Asthma/Whatisasthma.aspx#sthash.wg3pQ8rj.dpuf


All age groups are affected by attacks, most mainly starting in childhood, the disease is characterised by breathlessness and wheezing in recurrent attacks. Imagine not being able to catch your breath to speak, to ask for help, fear taking over this is what, for many Asthma feels like.
Asthma once carried through in to adult years is a life long condition although there is no cure for Asthma it can be managed well through medication and preventative methods.

Once diagnosed with Asthma knowing what triggers an "attack" is Important, Some triggers are seasonal so its unrealistic to completely avoid them all, but you can try to prepare as you see fit.
Specific triggers include allergens like dust mites found in house dust, carpets and pillows, molds, foods, grasses and pollens. Try to keep your house free from dust and change bed linens regularly to avoid dust build up.
Others triggers include viral infections such as cold and flu, irritants such as smoke, air fresheners, aerosols, paint fumes, hairsprays and perfumes, breathing in cold air and weather changes. Avoiding things like the cold air or cold and flu is practically impossible. You could talk to your GP about further medication and how to prepare for such occurrences.



If you suffer from Asthma its always a good idea to have an action plan in place, detailing what to do if you can feel an attack coming on, medication should always be carried with you and be stored in the same place, so that its easily accessible at all times and there is no confusion. Tell people about the condition, How many people do you know that has asthma but you never talk about it? Hospitalisation can be avoided and Attacks can be managed if the people around you have the appropriate knowledge and they know how to help, what is more you can maintain a free asthma card from Asthma UK so if you out and about on your own you can show anyone the card and it gives them the correct information on what actions they can take to help.

Recognise when an "Attack" has become an emergency, follow the action plan that is in place but if symptoms haven't started to subside within five minutes you should always dial 999.

For further Information on asthma visit Asthma UK or if it is for Asthma attack plans, medication, or any other information you should contact your GP or your local asthma specialist.


No-one knows what causes asthma (although genetics and environmental factors have been thought to play a part). It is characterised by inflammation and swelling of the lining of the airways leading to acute episodes known as ‘attacks’. - See more at: http://www.improvement.nhs.uk/lung/NationalImprovementProjects/Asthma/Whatisasthma.aspx#sthash.wg3pQ8rj.dpuf

No-one knows what causes asthma (although genetics and environmental factors have been thought to play a part). It is characterised by inflammation and swelling of the lining of the airways leading to acute episodes known as ‘attacks’. - See more at: http://www.improvement.nhs.uk/lung/NationalImprovementProjects/Asthma/Whatisasthma.aspx#sthash.wg3pQ8rj.dpuf
No-one knows what causes asthma (although genetics and environmental factors have been thought to play a part). It is characterised by inflammation and swelling of the lining of the airways leading to acute episodes known as ‘attacks’. - See more at: http://www.improvement.nhs.uk/lung/NationalImprovementProjects/Asthma/Whatisasthma.aspx#sthash.wg3pQ8rj.dpuf

2 comments:

  1. Very helpful post. One of the major reasons people die of asthma is because they think they've "grown out of it" and so stop carrying inhalors around - you never grow out of it and must always have meds on you just in case.

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    1. Yes I think you have a good point sometimes asthma isn't as severe and then something can trigger it and its how "attacks" become critical x

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